How to Fail a DIY Face Mask Like a Pro

How to Fail a DIY Face Mask Like a Pro

I had a few days off recently, so I thought I’d try to make a DIY face mask. I always see a bunch on Pinterest and think to myself “Well, those look easy to make. Plus they say it works, so it must be good”. Except when I made my own DIY face mask, it was NOT good.

I have acne prone skin, and I kept seeing a pin for baking soda masks that work wonders. So while I was bored at home, I decided to dig out the ingredients to make my own DIY face mask. But here’s what they don’t tell you.

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How to Fail a DIY Face Mask like a Pro:

I should have known it was going to be a failure when I clicked the link and there wasn’t an exact recipe. The site said things like “you need baking soda, honey, and a HALF a cup of water”. I have used a lot of face masks in my day, and none of them have EVER felt like they needed a half a cup of water. That is just crazy-town. But I got out the ingredients anyways.

How to Fail a DIY Face Mask like a Pro
I even poured myself a half glass of water.

I poured in the baking soda with water, honey, and apple cider vinegar, and it simply looked like runny-milk. Like runnier than milk could ever dream of being! Luckily, I have a tool from a peel-off face mask (Which I don’t recommend trying) that I could use to stir it with. So I poured out most of the water, added more baking soda, until I could reach a consistency like this.

How to Fail a DIY Face Mask like a Pro
A runny glue is a good stopping point, right?

Using my trusty tool (I’m not sure if I should call it a wand, shovel, or what?!), I scooped the runny, glue-like paste on to my skin. The baking soda felt grainy against my skin, and I was struggling to keep my DIY face mask actually on my face. But I let it dry for 10-15 minutes to see what would happen.

How to Fail a DIY Face Mask like a Pro
This is me trying to use the baking soda DIY face mask

I will say that the mixture did, in fact, harden. And when I washed it off, it felt like an exfoliator. And after it dried, I think my skin was softer. But I will probably never do it again. Instead, I’m going to stick to these non DIY face masks for my acne prone skin:

Face Masks that are good for Acne Prone Skin:

  1. Dead Sea Mud Mask (Especially as a spot-treatment over night)
  2. Deep Purifying Bubble Mask (The bubbles go insane. It’s awesome!)
  3. Yes to Charcoal Mask (It also exfoliates)
  4. Miss Spa Facial Deep Clean (Or any that are this brand really. They’re the best!)
  5. Que Bella Multi-Mask Trio (My new obsession!)

And if you want more skin care tips for your twenties, read my anti-aging article here or my on article on preventing dry winter skin here.

How to Fail a DIY Face Mask like a Pro

 

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3 Comments

  1. Oh, I’ve made that mask before. I think where you went wrong is with the water. Usually I use 1/2 cup liquid measuring cup, like the one you use in the kitchen, not an actual glass. Judging from the picture, your glass was pretty big and so you may have added more than 1/2 cup of water. I hope your next diy face mask turns out better 😁.

    1. Yes! When I put dumped the water and tried again it made more of a paste. MUCH better that way 🤣 thanks for the tip!!

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